Tag Archives: spring flowers

Plus ça change…

April 9th, 2019 | 11 Comments »

This winter feels interminable. Surely in earlier years daffodils have been blooming by now, snowdrops long gone.

Well, no. It’s true that in some years snowdrops have appeared by this date.

 

April 1, 2016 (1 of 1)
These snowdrops were shivering in the cold on April 1, 2016.

 

Crocus have bloomed.

 

These crocus were lighting up the hillside on April 4, 2010.
These crocus were lighting up the hillside on April 4, 2010.

 

Pulmonaria have added their touch of colour.

 

April 4, 2010+ (1 of 1)
This pulmonaria or lungwort was blooming on April 4, 2010.

 

But it is also true that this April is better than some.  A lot better.

 

This photo from April 7 2013 shows a very wintery garden.
This photo from April 7, 2013 shows a very wintery garden.

 

Last year in early April, the crabapple allée was snow-free and the central path, still unseeded, a straight line of mud.

 

Snow lingered in the ditches alongside the allée and the path was straight mud... we seeded it last summer and this year it should be green.
Snow lingered in the ditches alongside the crabapple allée on April 2, 2018.

 

This year on exactly the same date, patchy snow still covered the field around the crabapple allée. But at least  this year the path will soon be green.

 

I took this photo a week ago, on April 2. It looks much the same now.
I took this photo a week ago, on April 2. It looks much the same now.

 

Comparing photos from different years gives me hope. The photo below from a few years ago shows magnolia in the Lower Garden in full bloom on April 23. And that’s only two weeks away.

 

Spring came early in 2012.
Spring came early in 2012.

 

Whatever the weather, though, these guys will still be hanging around, looking like they own the world.

 

Here's looking at you, kid.
Luckily deer don’t like barberry bushes. Otherwise those shrubs would be stubs.

 

Plus ça change, plus c’est la même chose.

Jeffersonia Diphylla: My Favourite Plant

March 31st, 2019 | 14 Comments »
Jeffersonia diphylla grows in shady woodland conditions.
March is not leaving like a lamb. Lake Massawippi is still frozen solid, snow still covers the ground and today the wind is blowing fiercely. These unusually late winter conditions are discouraging, to say the least. But on the up side, they are giving me time to review some of the blogs I've written since I posted for the first time in January 2013. Over six years, in hundreds of blogs, I've reviewed books and gardens, considered issues in garden design, looked at how art is used in gardens and chronicled the development

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New Growth

April 29th, 2018 | 12 Comments »
A cheery face looks up to the sun.
Today it is grey and rainy but yesterday felt like spring. And how wonderful that was! Despite the soggy ground, covered in many places with deer pellets and dead leaves, I spent an hour or so wandering around the garden, enjoying the sunshine and the new growth that was popping up in every warm corner. For readers who live in milder climates or in places where spring has truly sprung, the thrill of seeing new growth may have come and gone. But living in a cold climate, where snow is still lurking

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A river of snowdrops

April 26th, 2013 | 3 Comments »
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Last year I dug up, divided and replanted about a dozen clumps of snowdrops. Amazing how a few bulbs will grow with time. According to my (less than perfect) planting records, originally I planted a few dozen snowdrops, ordinary ones that are readily available in most Canadian gardening catalogues.Thanks to an April 2012 blog post from Kathy Purdy of Cold Climate Gardening I decided to split the clumps. They were starting to look a bit overstuffed and I thought it would be worth the time and effort. Was I ever right!

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Spring arrives at Glen Villa! Finally.

April 22nd, 2013 | No Comments »
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Glory, hallelujah! Spring is finally here. Last Saturday the temperature rose to 24C (75 F). And suddenly, everything was bursting into bloom. Crocuses have been blooming for a few weeks now, and the suddenly warm day will shorten their life span. No matter. They remain a spot of light in the just-coming-to-life grass. No matter how many I plant, there are never enough. Crocuses shine, even in half-dead grass. Buds are forming on the Cornelian cherry (cornus mas), that most difficult of shrubs to photograph. The individual flowers are small and tucked

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