Tag Archives: Glen Villa

Autumn Colour

October 16th, 2018 | 6 Comments »

Autumn is spectacular in the Eastern Townships of Quebec. Unfortunately I’ve had little time to enjoy it this year, because earlier this month we sold our condominium in Montreal where we’ve lived for the last 22 years. Cleaning and sorting and disposing of the contents has taken a lot of time and effort. In fact, it’s been a real slog but thankfully I’ve had lots of help from family members. (Thank you, each and all!)

Understandably, blogging has taken a back seat to household work. But this past weekend, I took a break to enjoy some of the best that autumn offers. Here are a few scenes from Glen Villa, where, as of next week, I’ll be spending all my time. (Hooray!)  (And yes, if you do the math, you’ll see that the gap between sale and occupancy was less than three weeks. Whew!)

First is this scene along our driveway.

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White birch trees stand out against colourful leaves. The white wooden doorway in the distance marks the entrance of the China Terrace, the re-imagining of the old resort hotel that once stood on the property.

 

Nearby is this group of trees, resplendent in their brilliance.

Maple trees gleam in the sunlight.
Maple leaves gleam in the sunlight, offering a sharp contrast to the slender tree that has lost its leaves.

 

There’s a froth of colour at the Aqueduct.

Prairie dropseed, or Sporobolus heterlepis, drips and droops beside the Aqueduct.
Prairie dropseed, or Sporobolus heterolepis, drips and droops beside the Aqueduct. The red shrub behind it is Barberry ‘Ruby Glow.’

 

Beside it, this work horse spirea offers an unexpected touch of colour.

 

The reds, yellows and greens of Spirea japonica 'Magic Carpet' take us for an autumn ride.
The reds, yellows and greens of Spirea japonica ‘Magic Carpet’ take us for an autumn ride.

 

By the front door, our native witch hazel, with its twisted trunk, has an Asian look.

 

Soft tones of yellow and green adorn the witch hazel (Hammamaelis virginiana), while the twisting trunk adds an Asian touch.
Soft tones of yellow and green adorn the witch hazel (Hamamelis virginiana).

 

At its feet are bergenia.

 

Bergenia leaves present themselves as Christmas colours, red and green.
Bergenia leaves present themselves as Christmas colours, red and green.

 

Change in the garden occured gradually. A few weeks ago, the trees had only begun to turn.

 

A few weeks ago, the trees had only begun to change colour. The Glen Villa flag flies proudly above the Lower Garden.
The Glen Villa flag flies proudly above the Lower Garden.

 

Some things, though, never change — a turkey is always a turkey.

 

Wild turkeys enjoy walking along the Crabapple Allée.
Wild turkeys enjoy strolling along the Crabapple Allée, munching as they go.

 

A late Happy Thanksgiving to Canadian readers, and an early one to Americans. And to those who celebrate neither, Happy Fall.

Ends and Beginnings

September 3rd, 2018 | 6 Comments »
Spirea japonica 'Crispa'
I head to England today, where I'll be hosting my final garden tour. I'm sad about this ending, but at the same time, I'm happy to remember the people and places that have formed such a rewarding part of my life. And as I keep reminding myself, ends are also beginning. Before leaving for England, I took a walk around  the garden at Glen Villa to see what's in bloom and to assess what needs to be done when I return. Generally, things are looking pretty good.   [caption id="attachment_6668" align="aligncenter" width="4272"] The deer

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Nine Bridges, to Where?

August 30th, 2018 | 13 Comments »
The cedar will turn grey over the winter.
Last week we added two new bridges on the Timelines trail. They aren't large constructions but both allow us to keep our feet dry. The first bridge, near the end of the avenue of crabapple trees, avoids the ditch at the end of a culvert that goes underneath a road that connects our village of North Hatley to the neighbouring village of Sainte-Catherine-de-Hatley -- formerly known as Katevale.   [caption id="attachment_6611" align="aligncenter" width="4272"] Over time we've made this ditch deeper and wider by driving through it in a small all-wheel vehicle.[/caption]   The

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The Skating Pond, August 2018

August 19th, 2018 | 16 Comments »
A side view of the new bench shows how simple it is -- two rocks and two planks.
Sometimes small changes make a huge difference, or as I wrote last fall, Little Things Mean a Lot.  I was writing then about some small changes I'd made at the Skating Pond at Glen Villa, my garden in Quebec. Later in the fall, after I wrote about the changes, I made one more. I added a bench.   [caption id="attachment_6599" align="aligncenter" width="5184"] The slate under the bench was left over from a previous project.[/caption]   My sister immediately said the bench looked wrong -- and she was right.   [caption id="attachment_6600" align="aligncenter"

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Five Good Things and a Bad

June 25th, 2018 | 12 Comments »
Seeing the trees from a distance was like seeing a beacon of light, pulling you into a magic place.
As June shines its way towards July, I'm outside soaking it in and enjoying the garden at Glen Villa. There are too many happy-making things to show in a single post, so today I'm focusing on only four. First come the hawthorn trees. We planted them more than 15 years ago and they have proved a mixed blessing, blooming well in some years, not so well in others. This year they were spectacular.     [caption id="attachment_6453" align="aligncenter" width="5184"] Seeing the trees from a distance was like seeing a cloud of light,

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Crabapples in Bloom!

June 4th, 2018 | 20 Comments »
May 24, 2018
In just over a year, the Crabapple Allée, aka the Avenue, has gone from dream to dirt, to bloom and gone. We started with this, a dull bare field.   [caption id="attachment_6400" align="aligncenter" width="4272"] I took this photo on April 24, 2017, when I became serious about planting a long allée of trees,. The walk through the trees is part of a larger project I'm still working on.[/caption]   Four months later, The Avenue was beginning to take shape.   [caption id="attachment_6399" align="aligncenter" width="5184"] August 8, 2017[/caption]   By mid-November, the

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What’s in a Name?

June 1st, 2018 | 4 Comments »
cardamine diphylla (1 of 1)
I saw this wildflower in the woods last week and was surprised to learn its botanical name, Cardamine diphylla.     I was surprised because only a week or so ago, I looked up the name of another plant, now growing in damp areas in the garden and in the fields at Glen Villa. Its botanical name is Cardamine pratensis.   [caption id="attachment_6380" align="aligncenter" width="3264"] Lady's smock or milkmaids is growing beside the Glen Villa pond. It has bloomed for several weeks.[/caption]   What is the relationship between the two Cardamines? Are

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Terracing the China Terrace

May 29th, 2018 | 15 Comments »
terraces (1 of 1)
One of the first projects I undertook at Glen Villa was the China Terrace, a contemporary folly that honours an old resort hotel that once stood on the property. I first wrote about it as a conceptual garden. Following that, I wrote about it sporadically, focusing on the changes I made --  the bed that shook off its annuals in favour of a moss quilt,   [caption id="attachment_1565" align="aligncenter" width="1000"] Moss forms a quilt on an old iron frame bed.[/caption]   and the staircase leading to the imaginary second and third story that changed, from

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The Big Meadow, Year 3

May 24th, 2018 | 13 Comments »
Saturday late afternoon-020
In 2016, in order to discourage Canada geese from 'littering' the  lawn, we began to transform it into a meadow. We didn't follow the advice given by experts on how to create a meadow -- their process involved too much work and too much expense. Instead we simply stopped cutting the grass. We let it grow throughout the season and cut it only once in the fall, to mulch the leaves and to cut down any trees that were taking root. Now, entering the third year of this experiment, it is fascinating to see what is appearing. From a

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The Way to Go, or Not to Go

May 15th, 2018 | 18 Comments »
The Grotto of the Deluge marks the division between primitive life and the beginning of civilization.
  One of the decisions I have to make when groups visit Glen Villa is which way to go. Shall I to lead the group around the garden this way or that? In some gardens the choice is made for you. There is a set route that the garden maker or garden owner wants you to take. Or that the government authority in charge has dictated. This is the case at Villa Lante, the Renaissance garden built for Cardinal Gamberaia and now owned by the government of Italy. The Cardinal's garden used water to

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