Tag Archives: crabapple allée

Plus ça change…

April 9th, 2019 | 11 Comments »

This winter feels interminable. Surely in earlier years daffodils have been blooming by now, snowdrops long gone.

Well, no. It’s true that in some years snowdrops have appeared by this date.

 

April 1, 2016 (1 of 1)
These snowdrops were shivering in the cold on April 1, 2016.

 

Crocus have bloomed.

 

These crocus were lighting up the hillside on April 4, 2010.
These crocus were lighting up the hillside on April 4, 2010.

 

Pulmonaria have added their touch of colour.

 

April 4, 2010+ (1 of 1)
This pulmonaria or lungwort was blooming on April 4, 2010.

 

But it is also true that this April is better than some.  A lot better.

 

This photo from April 7 2013 shows a very wintery garden.
This photo from April 7, 2013 shows a very wintery garden.

 

Last year in early April, the crabapple allée was snow-free and the central path, still unseeded, a straight line of mud.

 

Snow lingered in the ditches alongside the allée and the path was straight mud... we seeded it last summer and this year it should be green.
Snow lingered in the ditches alongside the crabapple allée on April 2, 2018.

 

This year on exactly the same date, patchy snow still covered the field around the crabapple allée. But at least  this year the path will soon be green.

 

I took this photo a week ago, on April 2. It looks much the same now.
I took this photo a week ago, on April 2. It looks much the same now.

 

Comparing photos from different years gives me hope. The photo below from a few years ago shows magnolia in the Lower Garden in full bloom on April 23. And that’s only two weeks away.

 

Spring came early in 2012.
Spring came early in 2012.

 

Whatever the weather, though, these guys will still be hanging around, looking like they own the world.

 

Here's looking at you, kid.
Luckily deer don’t like barberry bushes. Otherwise those shrubs would be stubs.

 

Plus ça change, plus c’est la même chose.

This is spring?

March 25th, 2019 | 11 Comments »
A narrow road runs between these evergreens but you wouldn't know it from this photo.
According to the official calendar, spring arrived four days ago. Yet two days ago we received the largest dump of snow we've had all year -- 40 centimeters, or almost 16 inches. A late winter snowstorm is not unusual in the Eastern Townships of Quebec, where my garden Glen Villa is located. Snow tires are required in Quebec during winter; this year they could be removed legally after March 15. Pity anyone who did that -- the big dump came a full week later. Driving during the storm was perilous, even for a population that

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Crabapples in Bloom!

June 4th, 2018 | 20 Comments »
May 24, 2018
In just over a year, the Crabapple Allée, aka the Avenue, has gone from dream to dirt, to bloom and gone. We started with this, a dull bare field.   [caption id="attachment_6400" align="aligncenter" width="4272"] I took this photo on April 24, 2017, when I became serious about planting a long allée of trees,. The walk through the trees is part of a larger project I'm still working on.[/caption]   Four months later, The Avenue was beginning to take shape.   [caption id="attachment_6399" align="aligncenter" width="5184"] August 8, 2017[/caption]   By mid-November, the

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As the Garden Turns

April 22nd, 2018 | 12 Comments »
This garden in the Eastern Townships has a splendid view out over the countryside.
Does your garden turn its face to the world or does it veil it off?  The difference says a lot, about you and the style of your garden -- and about the spirit of the times. Recently I spoke to several groups about how to get the most out of garden visits.  Learning to Look: the Art of Garden Observation considers what it takes to really see a garden. A handout for the talk asks some key questions, starting with the garden's context.  How does it relate to the world around it? Is it open to its surroundings or closed off? Topography

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The Straight and (not very) Narrow

November 1st, 2017 | 23 Comments »
These crabapple trees in front of my daughter's house are Malus 'Dolgo.'
  When is a straight path not straight enough? When is it too narrow? Last March, I decided to transform an unused farm field into something spectacular by lining the path that ran through it  with crabapple trees. When the ground was barely thawed, I paced out the length to determine how many trees to order.   [caption id="attachment_5771" align="aligncenter" width="5169"] This path was a convenient short cut across a flat farm field.[/caption]   I was taken aback. We needed 100 trees, 50 each side, planted at 18 foot intervals. The number made me

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