Autumn colours is spectacular1

A Year in the Garden: Part 3

This final post of 2018, written on the last day of the year, brings the garden at Glen Villa to a close — for now, at least.

August is high summer in the Eastern Townships of Quebec.

The trail through the Joe Pye weed is luscious in August.
The trail through the Joe Pye weed is luscious in August, for bees and for pedestrians.

 

Insects make their presence known.

I'm not sure what flying creature this is, but I love the translucency of the wings.
I’m not sure what flying creature this is, but I love the translucency of the wings.

NOTE: Thanks to Mark A. for identifying this as a damselfly.

 

 

Roses bloom.
Roses re-bloom.

 

Chanterelles gleam in the woodland darkness.
Chanterelles gleam in the woodland darkness.

 

Near the house, a path leads up the hill and into the woods.

Petasites japnonica variegatus thrives in the shady woods.
Petasites japonicus variegatus thrives in the shady woods.

 

Canadian thistle blooms in sunny spots.
Canadian thistle blooms in sunny spots. Even though it is a pest of a plant, I like its form.

 

Autumn announces itself late in August.

Leaves in the Lower Garden are just beginning to change colour.
Leaves in the Lower Garden are just beginning to change colour.

 

It becomes more and more prominent as September progresses.

This tree is one of the first to change colour every year.
This little horse chestnut tree is one of the first to change colour every year.

 

Trees begin to change colour along the driveway.
Trees begin to change colour along the driveway.

 

Autumn colours is spectacular1
Autumn colours is spectacular.

 

I spent most of September in England, leading my final garden tour. But home again, October made its own strong statement.

Hydrangea's colour isn't spectacular but the dying form has its own appeal.
Hydrangea’s colour isn’t spectacular but the dying form has a delicate appeal.

 

The young buck is becoming a stag.
The young buck is becoming a stag.

 

Wild turkeys graze along the crabapple allée.

 

November is normally a boring month. This year, though, snow came early, giving the month an unexpected charm.

Snow caps the hawthorn trees by the road.
Snow caps the hawthorn trees by the road.

 

We spent lots of time constructing the temple façade, part of Timelines.

We started builing the façade in late October; work ended in early November with the first snowfall.
We started building the façade in late October; work ended in early November with the first snowfall.

 

A frosty morning coated all the trees with a gleam of ice.
A frosty morning coated all the trees with a gleam of ice.

 

Turkeys crossed the road -- who knows why!
Turkeys crossed the road — who knows why!

 

A wet heavy snow weighed down all the tree branches along the driveway.
A wet heavy snow weighed down all the tree branches along the driveway.

 

Finally, a look at what 2019 may bring -- sunbeams and glorious light.
Finally, a look at what 2019 may bring — sunbeams and glorious light.

 

May 2019 bring you happiness at home and in the garden.

  • Judy Hertz

    Just spectacular, some lovely photos in these three posts, Pat. You’ve added so many new pieces since we were there three years ago! I’d love to see the allege in bloom.

    • siteandinsight

      You and Jason are welcome any time!

  • “Wild turkeys graze along the crabapple allée,”really, I knew they would use it as a landing strip!!!!! All the best for 2019!

    • siteandinsight

      And why not?

  • Kris Peterson

    Your Glen Vila Gardens are spectacular in all seasons and the art installations throughout are simply perfect. Best wishes for equally beautiful views in 2019, Pat!

    • siteandinsight

      Thanks, Kris. A ‘winter garden’ means something quite different in Quebec, where snow can be VERY deep. But for the moment, with only about 6 inches or so, we can still see the bones of the garden. But please, let spring come soon!